new-aesthetic: Malcolm Harris on Glitch…


new-aesthetic:
“Malcolm Harris on Glitch Capitalism and AI Logic
“In the stories of algorithms gone haywire, the glitches prompt programmers to reassess what they really want from their programs, and how to get it. What we can learn from the errors...

new-aesthetic:

Malcolm Harris on Glitch Capitalism and AI Logic

In the stories of algorithms gone haywire, the glitches prompt programmers to reassess what they really want from their programs, and how to get it. What we can learn from the errors of machine learning is that we do not have to live according to a set of rules that produces obviously unfair and undesirable outcomes like a bloated one percent, apartheid prisons, and the single worst person in the country as president. There are American political traditions that saw these problems coming and envisioned relationships between our algorithms, our state, and ourselves better than the one we have now. For instance, the final clause of the tenth point of the Black Panther Party’s 1972 Ten-Point Program was “people’s community control over modern technology” — that sounds like a good idea, especially compared to walking on your face.

But until we reassert control over our societal machine learning, we’re stuck face-planting. I remember the scholar Cornel West telling a joke about success as a narrow goal: “Success is easy!” he said. Then, mimicking a mugger, “Gimme your wallet.” America looks like a glitchy computer, and it’s because capitalism is a machine language, reducible to numbers. America exists to create wealth, and the system isn’t broken, it’s just obeying the rules to disaster; as a country, we’re more ourselves than ever. Donald Trump, who seems to be speedrunning American democracy, is like a living, breathing cheat code, proceeding through life by shortcuts alone. But if Trump represents a terminal failure of this system, it’s because he is a solution, and the easiest one in our current environment. He reminds me of another one of Shane’s examples: A program that, told to sort a list of numbers, simply deleted them. Nothing left to sort.

Ericsson Mobility Report  In this Ericsson…


Ericsson Mobility Report
In this Ericsson Mobility Report, we continue to describe the evolution towards the Networked Society.
Internet of Things (IoT) is expected to surpass mobile phones as the largest category of connected devices in 2018
Between...

Ericsson Mobility Report 

In this Ericsson Mobility Report, we continue to describe the evolution towards the Networked Society.

Internet of Things (IoT) is expected to surpass mobile phones as the largest category of connected devices in 2018

Between 2015 and 2021, IoT is expected to increase at a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of 23 percent, making up close to 16 billion of the total forecast 28 billion connected devices by 2021.

LTE subscriptions grew at a high rate during Q1 2016. There were 150 million new subscriptions during the quarter, reaching a total of 1.2 billion worldwide. Subscriptions associated with smartphones also continue to increase, and are expected to exceed those for basic phones in Q3 this year.

We have included four feature articles in this report, exploring various aspects of the mobile industry. First we look into how microwave backhaul links can be used as accurate, high resolution rainfall measurement tools.

Weather impacts almost everything we do, and accurate weather forecasts are vital.

We also examine how teens drive the changing TV/video viewing behavior, which is moving from traditional TVs to streaming video on smartphones.

The article on managing user experience describes how high traffic load in less than a tenth of the mobile radio cells in metropolitan areas can affect more than half of the user activity over the course of 24 hours.

Finally, we discuss the need for global spectrum harmonization to secure early 5G deployments. We hope you find the report engaging and valuable.