How the Saudis ended up with so many American weapons

How the Saudis ended up with so many American weapons
And why they want more.

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Saudi Arabia and the US have a partnership that’s been in the making for over seven decades. It started after World War II and survived the Iranian Revolution, the Cold War, the Gulf War, September 11, and the proliferation of conflicts across the Middle East. This whole time, the US has been selling weapons to Saudi Arabia — now its number one customer. Saudis bought bombs, tanks, guns, and planes over the years to defend themselves from various threats. The US supplied those weapons because the Saudi’s threats have usually been a threat to the US as well.

Today, there’s a shift in the relationship. Saudi Arabia’s intervention in Yemen has created the worst humanitarian disaster in the world – and thrown the Middle East into chaos. The problem is, the Saudis are using US bombs to do it.

Sources:
US-Saudi arms agreements data: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute and the Defense Security Cooperation Agency
Arab-Israeli arms race: Congressional Research Service and the Washington Institute for Near East Policy
US-Saudi arms policy: Center for International Policy and the Brookings Institute
Yemen airstrikes: Human Rights Watch
Dahyan, Yemen, school bus bombing: Bellingcat

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How the Saudis ended up with so many American weapons

How the Saudis ended up with so many American weapons
And why they want more.

Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO

Saudi Arabia and the US have a partnership that’s been in the making for over seven decades. It started after World War II and survived the Iranian Revolution, the Cold War, the Gulf War, September 11, and the proliferation of conflicts across the Middle East. This whole time, the US has been selling weapons to Saudi Arabia — now its number one customer. Saudis bought bombs, tanks, guns, and planes over the years to defend themselves from various threats. The US supplied those weapons because the Saudi’s threats have usually been a threat to the US as well.

Today, there’s a shift in the relationship. Saudi Arabia’s intervention in Yemen has created the worst humanitarian disaster in the world – and thrown the Middle East into chaos. The problem is, the Saudis are using US bombs to do it.

Sources:
US-Saudi arms agreements data: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute and the Defense Security Cooperation Agency
Arab-Israeli arms race: Congressional Research Service and the Washington Institute for Near East Policy
US-Saudi arms policy: Center for International Policy and the Brookings Institute
Yemen airstrikes: Human Rights Watch
Dahyan, Yemen, school bus bombing: Bellingcat

Additional reading:
https://ift.tt/2pUUPV4

https://ift.tt/2Ewizsd

https://ift.tt/2EiUULc

https://ift.tt/2Et1KPb

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com.

Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE
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How the Saudis ended up with so many American weapons

How the Saudis ended up with so many American weapons
And why they want more.

Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO

Saudi Arabia and the US have a partnership that’s been in the making for over seven decades. It started after World War II and survived the Iranian Revolution, the Cold War, the Gulf War, September 11, and the proliferation of conflicts across the Middle East. This whole time, the US has been selling weapons to Saudi Arabia — now its number one customer. Saudis bought bombs, tanks, guns, and planes over the years to defend themselves from various threats. The US supplied those weapons because the Saudi’s threats have usually been a threat to the US as well.

Today, there’s a shift in the relationship. Saudi Arabia’s intervention in Yemen has created the worst humanitarian disaster in the world – and thrown the Middle East into chaos. The problem is, the Saudis are using US bombs to do it.

Sources:
US-Saudi arms agreements data: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute and the Defense Security Cooperation Agency
Arab-Israeli arms race: Congressional Research Service and the Washington Institute for Near East Policy
US-Saudi arms policy: Center for International Policy and the Brookings Institute
Yemen airstrikes: Human Rights Watch
Dahyan, Yemen, school bus bombing: Bellingcat

Additional reading:
https://ift.tt/2pUUPV4

https://ift.tt/2Ewizsd

https://ift.tt/2EiUULc

https://ift.tt/2Et1KPb

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com.

Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE
Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

How the Saudis ended up with so many American weapons

How the Saudis ended up with so many American weapons
And why they want more.

Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO

Saudi Arabia and the US have a partnership that’s been in the making for over seven decades. It started after World War II and survived the Iranian Revolution, the Cold War, the Gulf War, September 11, and the proliferation of conflicts across the Middle East. This whole time, the US has been selling weapons to Saudi Arabia — now its number one customer. Saudis bought bombs, tanks, guns, and planes over the years to defend themselves from various threats. The US supplied those weapons because the Saudi’s threats have usually been a threat to the US as well.

Today, there’s a shift in the relationship. Saudi Arabia’s intervention in Yemen has created the worst humanitarian disaster in the world – and thrown the Middle East into chaos. The problem is, the Saudis are using US bombs to do it.

Sources:
US-Saudi arms agreements data: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute and the Defense Security Cooperation Agency
Arab-Israeli arms race: Congressional Research Service and the Washington Institute for Near East Policy
US-Saudi arms policy: Center for International Policy and the Brookings Institute
Yemen airstrikes: Human Rights Watch
Dahyan, Yemen, school bus bombing: Bellingcat

Additional reading:
https://ift.tt/2pUUPV4

https://ift.tt/2Ewizsd

https://ift.tt/2EiUULc

https://ift.tt/2Et1KPb

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com.

Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE
Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

How the Saudis ended up with so many American weapons

How the Saudis ended up with so many American weapons
And why they want more.

Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO

Saudi Arabia and the US have a partnership that’s been in the making for over seven decades. It started after World War II and survived the Iranian Revolution, the Cold War, the Gulf War, September 11, and the proliferation of conflicts across the Middle East. This whole time, the US has been selling weapons to Saudi Arabia — now its number one customer. Saudis bought bombs, tanks, guns, and planes over the years to defend themselves from various threats. The US supplied those weapons because the Saudi’s threats have usually been a threat to the US as well.

Today, there’s a shift in the relationship. Saudi Arabia’s intervention in Yemen has created the worst humanitarian disaster in the world – and thrown the Middle East into chaos. The problem is, the Saudis are using US bombs to do it.

Sources:
US-Saudi arms agreements data: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute and the Defense Security Cooperation Agency
Arab-Israeli arms race: Congressional Research Service and the Washington Institute for Near East Policy
US-Saudi arms policy: Center for International Policy and the Brookings Institute
Yemen airstrikes: Human Rights Watch
Dahyan, Yemen, school bus bombing: Bellingcat

Additional reading:
https://ift.tt/2pUUPV4

https://ift.tt/2Ewizsd

https://ift.tt/2EiUULc

https://ift.tt/2Et1KPb

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com.

Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE
Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
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China’s “Social Credit System” Has Caused More Than Just Public Shaming (HBO)

China’s “Social Credit System” Has Caused More Than Just Public Shaming (HBO)
China is testing a new plan to urge its citizens to do more good and be more trustworthy – the Social Credit System. It’s kind of like the American credit score, except it tracks far more than financial transactions. It tracks good — and bad — deeds.

Part of the system is a neighbor watch program that’s being piloted across the country where designated watchers are paid to record people’s behaviors that factor into their social credit score. A high score could bring you lower interest loans and discounted rent and utility bills, but if your score is low, you can be subjected to public shaming or even banned from certain kinds of travel, life gets hard.

China’s economy has exploded over the past decades, economic reforms required banks to be able to evaluate individuals looking to borrow money to buy houses or start new businesses. Fraud and excess borrowing were rampant because most people didn’t really have much of a credit history. To measure its citizens’ trustworthiness, in 2014, The State Council laid out a plan that aims to build a centralized database to evaluate individuals and organizations based on their financial and social behaviors.

The program is scheduled to be nationwide by 2020, which means every Chinese citizen will be tracked, scored, and receive perks and restrictions accordingly.

VICE News went to a village in one of the first pilot cities to see how the local office funnels the behaviors of 3,000 residents in this neighborhood into social credit scores.

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Crypto, the Future of Trust

Crypto, the Future of Trust
For eons, human beings have been collaborating and coordinating their activities towards some common goal — moving from families to roaming small groups to towns and cities to institutions — because of the ability to intermediate trust.

But thanks to the internet revolution, we’re now able to collaborate at an entirely new scale…the only question is, how do we do this in a decentralized way, and scale trust without relying on middlemen? That’s where cryptonetworks come in, and they’re not just the next big revolution in tech, but are actually an evolution from where we’ve been, to where we are today, to where we’re going. So in this talk — originally delivered at a16z’s annual innovation summit, which features invited speakers from various organizations discussing innovation and the evolution of tech trends — a16z crypto partner Ali Yahya (formerly a software engineer and machine learning researcher at GoogleX and Google Brain) shares an overview of crypto… through the lens of the past, and future, of trust.

Brexit (2019) | Official Trailer | HBO

Brexit (2019) | Official Trailer | HBO
Everyone knows who won. Not everyone knows how. Brexit premieres January 19, 2019 on HBO.

#Brexit

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Beyond Cryptocurrencies

Beyond Cryptocurrencies
From the quest for digital money and history of Bitcoin, to the emergence of Ethereum and smart contracts, this short presentation from Linda Xie (co-founder and managing director of Scalar Capital, and former product manager at Coinbase) covers a practical introduction and tour through key terms and concepts in the crypto(currencies, tokens, networks) space.

The talk was given at a16z’s annual innovation summit, which features invited speakers from various organizations discussing innovation and the evolution of tech trends. So beyond solving existing problems and use cases, what completely new applications does crypto also enable?

Crypto, Beyond Silk Road

Crypto, Beyond Silk Road
As a former Department of Justice prosecutor, Katie Haun set up the first-ever “cryptocurrency task force” for the U.S. government. She also led the investigations into the Mt. Gox hack and the corrupt agents on the Silk Road task force — the first cases of the U.S. government using the bitcoin blockchain to fight fraud, not just against criminals but against their own.

Haun — Coinbase board member, Stanford lecturer, and now general partner on a16z crypto — shares that story in this talk, originally delivered at a16z’s annual innovation summit, which features invited speakers from various organizations discussing innovation and the evolution of tech trends. So she further dispels some misconceptions about crypto, sharing use cases beyond speculation around the world, where crypto is being used to address hyperinflation, help the unbanked, ease international remittances, and more.